Posts Tagged ‘TheaterScene

02
May
18

Randy Writes A Novel: My Review

Randy Writes A Novel 1Randy has written a novel and he wants to read it to you. Actually, he needs to read it to you. He’s slaved and labored and sacrificed to get it done and he wants to make sure it’s just right. He wants to know if it qualifies as art. He must know if it measures up to the great authors that have come before him and even the ones that will come after him. His search for artistic perfection is his main driving force. So much so that he’s not even sure that his art exists whether he reads it out loud or not. He even questions if you just knowing he wrote something is enough to mark his work as artistically sublime. He wonders if he really needs to read it to you at all. This drives Randy’s existential dilemma. It’s why Randy continues to distract himself from the task at hand.

Randy is a puppet. A very self-aware puppet in fact. Not only that, he’s a puppet on a hysterically funny journey to discover the meaning of life and all its peculiarities. He wants to know what makes us all tick. Randy is alone for the entire ninety-minute mind trip onstage at Theatre Row’s Clurman Theatre. He’s at his desk, well used  typewriter to his right, continually unread manuscript to his left, and strewn all around the floor are chaotic piles of books and torn and crumpled papers. Randy’s been hard at work and his mind is a buzz with thoughts he must express. All of Randy’s work pays off in a very funny evening of outright truths, blatant lies, broad exaggerations, and accurate observations

An evening with Randy is a combination of stand-up comedy and puppetry. It’s both wildly improvised and intelligently scripted. You’ll find yourself literally howling with laughter. Randy encourages that. He loves his audience to shout back at him, question his observations, and articulate their own opinions. The whole evening becomes a riotous amalgamation of master puppet and willing audience. You’ll find yourself laughing through riffs on Harper Lee’s other book, a three-and-a-half-minute condensed version on the life of Ernest Hemingway that blossoms into a remarkably funny yet astute conversation on the value of art versus character. You’ll also find social commentary being delivered on subjects like Veganism versus Carnism and there’s a Craig’s List story that will have you doubled over with an ending you will never forget. All this and more while Randy struggles and keeps stalling the reading of his presumably epic creation.

Randy’s own puppet master is a mystery. Whoever it is doesn’t want you to know because it doesn’t matter. Randy is Randy. He’s his own man with his own thoughts. Randy has been lauded and acclaimed. He’s travelled the world presenting and perfecting himself before many an adoring crowd. Before arriving in New York, he toured the country in order to understand his American fans better. The puppet has done his homework. Randy himself will tell you that what he’s presenting on stage is an anthropological social experiment and one helluva good time. As always Randy, a philosopher in fabric and flock, is more than right.

Clurman Theatre
Theatre Row
410 W 42nd St
New York, NY 10036
212.239.6200
http://randywritesanovel.com/
$81.25
April 18 – June 9, 2018

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror Writers Association.

01
May
18

The Metromaniacs: My Review

Metromaniacs 2Words. Words. Words. Beautiful luscious words. Set in rhymes. Framed in metaphors. Hung in allegories. Displayed with glorious grace, slick style, and unending rapturous wit. The rhyme rules here and while some are more forced than others they all manage to fall lovingly on the ear. The plot of Red Bull Theater’s production of The Metromaniacs is madness triumphant. It’s the wackadoodle stuff of classical French farce set to a modern world extreme. Presented as a translaptation, a combination of translation and adaptation, written by the gifted and proven playwright David Ives, the text is from the original obscure 1738 play La Metromanie by Alexis Piron. The script itself is most definitely the central driving force and provides the necessary gunpowder for the fireworks to follow.

On stage at The Duke on 42nd Street theater a decadent spring has sprung in the year 1738 and in the ballroom setting of a grand house in Paris, a play is in the making and madness is about to ensue. Metromania, a mania for poetry, is the driving obsession of the period. Love is in the air, so is artistic creation, familial foibles, and all the players involved are incognito to some degree or another. The exact story is a furiously fast paced layered delight that is yours to discover and savor. The sometimes pleasantly dizzying series of events rests on the shoulders of an extremely capable and stellar assortment of actors and their characters.

Metromaniacs 1Christian Conn is a comedic cyclone as Damis, a young poet that has fallen in love with a mysterious female poet that he only knows in print and is later revealed, unknown to him, to be a man. Mondor, Damis’s valet, as presented by Adam Green is a hilarious foil that tries to bring things back down to earth again and again but just manages to get himself further entrenched in it all. Lucille, a young woman in love with poetry, played with broad Mean Girls sass and vacancy by Amelia Pedlow finds herself looking for love even though it never occurred to her to search for it before this day. Noah Averbach-Katz plays Dorante, the young man in love with Lucille, with zany delight as he attempts to court her as someone very much other than himself.

Lisette, Lucille’s maid, in the hands of Dina Thomas, at times coming dangerously close to stealing the show, is the clever sneaky center of this madcap maze. Francalou, Lucille’s father, who wrote the evening’s entertainment, desperately wants to marry off his daughter and also ends up being Damis’s gender fluid poet, is wonderfully funny and charming as portrayed by theater veteran Adam LeFevre. And Peter Kybart is a literal blast as Baliveau, Damis’s closeminded, rich, grumpy, thespian to be, uncle. The entire ensemble is spectacular and they’re having as much of a good time with this elegant screwball comedy as the audience is and that plusses the fun.

Metromaniacs 3This is a hold on to your hats boys and girls production and under the direction of Michael Kahn it’s a roller coaster ride that leaves you breathless with joy. The singular set by James Noone is gorgeous as are the costumes designed by Murell Horton and the wigs created by Dori Beau Seigneur. The Metromaniacs is a must see show for those that love words, wordplay, farce, fantasy, intelligent and broad slapstick comedy, and lush deliciously presented theatricality. The Metromaniacs is a rare and sumptuous treat you must enjoy while you can.

The Duke on 42nd St
229 W 42nd St
New York NY 10036
646.223.3010 ext.8
www.redbulltheater.com/the-metromaniacs
$75-$95
April 10 – May 26, 2018

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror Writers Association.

28
Mar
18

Grand Hotel, The Musical: My Review

Grand Hotel 2With a deeply engrossing book by Luther Davis and the beautiful music and lyrics by Robert Wright and George Forrest, the legend that is Grand Hotel, The Musical has reappeared once more to grace the New York City Center stage in all its glory. Reincarnation is the hallmark of this storied blockbuster. It was first a novel by Vicki Baum in 1929, it then became a star studded legendary MGM film in 1932, its first sadly unsuccessful attempt at a Los Angeles theatrical production followed in 1958, but it wasn’t until Tommy Tune breathed life into this in-depth multi-character story for a Broadway run in 1989 did Grand Hotel come to glittering life.

The setting is Berlin and the year is 1928. The roaring twenties are still in vogue and the world has yet to feel the sting of the Great Depression. On this particular weekend, a particular set of characters make their way through the lobby of the Grand Hotel. As they each check in they have no idea that their lives will be forever intertwined.

Their stories are told to us by the hotel’s unofficial resident doctor Colonel Otternschlag. He’s seen it all because even though he always decides to check out he invariably decides to stay for one more day. In this role the very talented William Ryall, a member of not only the original Broadway production but various incarnations since, serves as a more than fitting tour guide. An aging and failing ballerina Elizaveta Grushinskaya, danced beautifully by acclaimed ballerina Irina Dvorovenko, arrives for yet another tiring tour. There’s perpetual unpaid guest Baron Felix von Gaigern who’s more of a broke and down on his luck thief played with romance and flair by James Snyder.

Grand Hotel 1The voices and talents of the principle cast are all equally powerful but it’s the fatally ill bookkeeper Otto Kringelein, who is seeking a few last moments of living a life of grandeur, and the young typist Flaemmchen, who fantasizes about escape and becoming an American film star, that steal the show here. The performances of Brandon Uranowitz and Helene Yorke in those roles are both funny and touching and can’t help but bring a tear to the eye as they slowly find each other.

The Wright and Forrest songbook, made possible by a show saving assist with additional music and lyrics from theatre icon Maury Yeston, is twenty-four numbers long providing several opportunities for the company to exhibit their considerable skills. The tap dancing duo of James T. Lane and Daniel Yearwood in “Maybe My Baby” are absolutely delightful. “Girl in The Mirror” lets Helene Yorke’s charms shine. Brandon Uranowitz and James Snyder, along with the aforementioned Lane and Yearwood accompanied by the ensemble, tear things up with the raucous antics of “We’ll Take a Glass Together”. The love ballad “Love Can’t Happen” once again highlights Snyder, this time with leading lady Irina Dvorovenko, provides a sincere tug at the heartstrings. And the beautifully staged “Bolero” tango, directed and danced by Junior Cervila and Guadalupe Garcia, is a dark and delicious treat.

Grand Hotel 4Grand Hotel is a luxurious and luscious cavalcade of theatrical wonders. The moment Ken Billington’s deep, rich lightening hits Allen Moyer’s gorgeous set you instantly know you’re in for a treat. Moyer pays homage to this show’s history by once again putting the supremely gifted orchestra, led by Rob Berman, on stage and above the performers, he also retained two chandeliers which marked the original 1989 set, and while there was no revolving door for the characters to sashay through, a large gold framed mirror placed upstage on the upper tier gave an even better way for them to all seemingly emerge. Inhabiting this world of color and light are the equally lush costumes of designer Linda Cho. Her work accentuates and solidifies all the surrounding splendor.

The same remembrances can be said of Josh Rhodes’ masterful direction and equally powerful choreography. Rhodes gives a nod to original director Tommy Tune’s gold painted ballroom chairs that helped to enrich the minimalist world of its predecessor. Rhodes also enlists the aide of an almost ever-present chorus to not only sing and dance their hearts out but to also build an entire world with the use of those chairs and in some cases even their own bodies.

Grand Hotel 3This production of Grand Hotel is not a perfect show. There are a few things that don’t gel, but they’re mere quibbles. Every Encore! show could use a bit more time to achieve true perfection. But the tight rehearsal schedule and immediate on demand delivery provides an electric energy that makes the best productions in their twenty-five seasons leave a lasting impression. In this case Grand Hotel, The Musical shines and stands apart as a true legendary vehicle should.

There’s a mystery that comes with an exceptionally exquisite revival. A kind of ghostly reminiscence that lingers from the magic that brought the original production to life. This new Grand Hotel is haunted in that sublime way. As the character’s first appear, for as long as they stay, and until they all check out you feel their alchemical energy pulse through you. You feel rewarded to have witnessed them again, even if it’s just briefly, and you truly wish they could stay, for just one more day.

New York City Center
Main Stage
131 West 55th St,
New York, NY
www.nycitycenter.org/pdps/grandhotel/
212.581.1212
Mar 21 – 25, 2018

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror  Writers Association.

26
Mar
18

Prurience: My Review

Prurience 1An old woman sits quietly in a chair. Her chair is one of many in a circle. She sits amongst a group of fellow addicts that are in need of confession. Admissions and revelations begin spewing forth until she decides it’s her turn. She then tells the story of a date she had when she was a young woman. Her date had her meet him in New York’s Times Square. He began by touring her about the then seedy stretch of strip joints and porn theaters. She’s slightly offended but can’t help to be a bit turned on. The young man convinces her to step inside one of those porn theaters to experience her first pornographic film. Lo and behold the man she’s with is starring in the film. Afterwards they sleep together, fall in love, and then she decides to move in with him.

It’s an intriguing story. What makes it intriguing isn’t the content of the story. It’s that one is wondering throughout the lurid revelation whether the old woman is telling the truth or whether she’s one of the many actors sitting in a circle at the Guggenheim Museum’s restaurant The Wright. They’re all playing a part in an experimental immersive theatrical production produced by Works & Process at the Guggenheim. Prurience is an almost two-hour long group therapy session for porn addicts and you’re invited along for the fun. That is if paying good hard-earned money to sit through an almost two-hour long group therapy session for porn addicts is your idea of fun.

The Prurience Method is a supposed modern-day bastardized self-help Masters and Johnson for porno addicts. They hold regular weekly meetings were everyone grabs a chair, sits in a circle, and shares. The annoying, pony tailed, logo baseball cap wearing host, who feigns being late like he always is, makes his introduction and lays out the rules. Have some tea and cookies. Sing the indoctrination song. Lots of greet your neighbor and acknowledge each other’s presence. Collaborate with others in the word play games. Put post it notes with helpful thoughts on the feedback tree. Confess your addiction but don’t demand results. Watch the video tape of founder and former porn star, producer, and director Amelia Atkins.

This is all geared to unlocking your memories, desires, and need to reveal your overt love of porn. This is all meant to be both satire and drama and Prurience is not always successful at either. Created and written by British performance artist, and the evenings host, Christopher Green, and directed along with his co-director Holly Race Roughan, Prurience presents an evening of both performers and perhaps audience members revealing their intimate sexual secrets. Some actors are better at this than others. Some audience members are actors that are not. Without a program there’s no way of knowing who the players are as story after story are told. At the end of the performance piece nine actors behave as if they’re the phonies but this may be an illusion as well because it felt like more actors were involved in attempting the illusion.

People have an inherent psychological need to follow and the creators take advantage of that but the problem with Prurience is that it cannot just be experienced. Prurience insists that you believe. Prurience insists that you participate. Oddly enough there’s no room for the voyeur here because once you just observe you can clearly see the cracks in the flimsy façade. The structure and illusion doesn’t always hold. It’s not that the subject matter is uncomfortable. It’s that the presentation of it is awkward and annoying in its lack of truth. The sad punchline is that no one gets any help. In that way there is no drama. Only emotional presentation. There are confessions but no conclusions.

Like a bad overlong sketch with no ending in sight the session quickly devolves into an overlong, overlapping, extremely grating shouting match which we’re supposed to believe causes an abrupt end to the fake festivities. This then requires an actual intervention. Even that doesn’t play well. What happens next to wrap up this circle jerk is so absurd that its best left to those who are willing to endure the Prurience method and experience the closing disco lit musical number. Suffice it to say the actual method here is in and of itself a confused attempt to entertain but ultimately proves flacid.

The Wright Restaurant
1071 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10128
https://www.guggenheim.org/event/prurience
(212) 423-3575
March 21 – 31, 2018
$45

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror  Writers Association.

14
Mar
18

Wicked Clone: My Review

Wicked Clone 1Take equal doses of Transylvanian folklore, Goethe, Faust, Ibsen, Dante, booming Werner Herzog like voice overs, stock footage movie moments projected on a supposed magic mirror, club dance moves, electronic beats, roller blades, circus arts, daddy dom issues, notions of sin and redemption, and overt sexuality. Now toss it all in a blender, hit frappe again and again, and once properly mixed, hurl the resulting concoction all over a black box stage. This will give you an approximation of the gloriously spectacular, misguided avant-garde, multimedia, passion project being served up at the Davenport Theatre.

Let us begin at the beginning of this torrid tale. Wicked Clone is the story of two identical twin sisters born in Transylvania in 1483 to Vlad the Impaler himself. Mihaela and Gabriela are opposite acorns not falling far from the same blood-thirsty tree. Mihaela is the somewhat good girl who questions her existence and is always in search of love. Gabriela is the totally bad girl that always seeks vengeance and is constantly jealous of her sister’s ambitions. Both being undead daddy’s girls they can’t help but do battle with each other.

Mihaela flees from Transylvania to 2018 New York and pulls her fangs out in order to find love and become a human. She then writes a book and mounts a Broadway show based on her life and writings. Twin sister Gabriela also follows Mihaela through space and time to return her sister to her vampiric roots and back under now actually dead daddy’s demonic control. Mihaela falls in love with a human poet who, in the midst of being killed by Gabriela, manages to bite Mihaela which turns her human. That doesn’t stick though, since no plot point lingers in this story, so her fangs start to grow back and soon enough both sisters are at each other’s throats again. If this all sounds like a confused and convoluted mess it’s because that’s exactly what this is.

Wicked Clone 2Wicked Clone is performed, choreographed, scored, designed, and teched by Transylvanian born American artists Mihaela and Gabriela Modorcea. Mihaela wrote the novel, Wicked Clone or How to Deal with the Evil on which her script for the show is based. Both sisters traveled to America and ended up creating Wicked Clone as a production to showcase their many skills and find fame and fortune on the Great White Way. If this all sounds familiar that’s because it is indeed all too familiar. In an extreme case of life imitating art, these multi-talented identical twin sisters have birthed what they call a cinema musical, which they believe is a new genre that projects the audience into an immersive blend of theater and film projection.

According to the program Wicked Clone was directed by God. If true the Creator has much to answer for as far as his, or her, theatrical choices are concerned. The music is the stuff of dance floor fodder, but as a musical there’s not a hummable memorable tune in the entire lot of nineteen original pop-gypsy compositions imbedded in the drama. The sisters Modorcea are not without talent. They can sing. They can dance. They can write pop happy electronic dance music. They also managed to mount what is an ambitious production. Their faith in themselves to create something artistically grand is heroic and an argument can be made here for experimental theatre reminiscent of the Warhol crowd. The shear audaciousness of the thing makes one want the sisters Modorcea to succeed at their attempt to create dark cinema theatre magic, but there are a mountain of obstacles rising against them and many are self-perpetuated.

Davenport Theatre
354 West 45th St
New York, NY 10039
www.wickedclone.com
212.956.0948
$69
March 8 – May 27, 2018

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror Writers Association.

03
Feb
18

Puffs: My Review

Puffs2An owl has arrived to deliver a message to a young boy. The lucky recipient of this owlgram has been accepted into a little known world renowned school of magic. He is to be taken from his humdrum life and set upon a new course and the magical adventure of his life. The catch is that this is not merry old England and this is not the boy legend in the making Harry Potter. This is New Mexico in the good old US of A and the boy is an awkward, and not that much of a gifted wizard to be, named Wayne. Nonetheless, Wayne is whisked off to England to experience ‘seven increasingly eventful years at a certain school of magic and magic’ just like the infamous Harry.

While Harry does make occasional appearances in this tale this story belongs to Wayne and all his fellow Puffs, the magical house he’s sorted into for his time at the school. This is a mirror world of the Potter books and if you don’t know them you will have some problems catching all the jokes in this very clever, fast paced, hysterically funny farce. While elements of the books play out in the periphery, this version is all about the Puffs and their mutual adventures of just getting through school and dealing with all the mayhem that Harry creates in his wake. The Puffs are endearing misfits but they know it and that always seems to empower them forward through their mutual endeavors.

The ensemble cast is exactly that in every sense of the word. They are frenetic poetry in zany motion and to lose any one of these skillful cartoon treasures would be to collapse this magical school’s house of cards. In total the company of thirteen players portray fifty three characters and features the talents of Langston Belton, Madeleine Bundy, Jessie Cannizzaro, Nick Carrillo, Anna Dart, A.J. Ditty, Julie Ann Earls, James Fouhey, Jake Keefe, Andy Miller, Zac Moon, Eleanor Philips and Stephen Stout.

Puffs1The design work on this production is clever to the max with every department delivering excellence. Madeleine Bundy’s set, costume, and prop designs are at the center of it all. Her set gives the reigning Broadway work of The Play That Goes Wrong a run for its money. Its backstage reverse world look and feel serves as the visual foundation in this frenzied world. Her hodgepodge of costumes is in all actuality a well-organized balance of quick change mastery that fits well within the mania and lets the audience keep track of the many characters and their houses as they fly by.

It’s writer Matt Cox’s book of secrets that drives this glorious insanity. His work reveals a true and genuine love of the parodied Potter source material. He provides not only comedic reverence to the proceedings but also isn’t at all afraid to skewer its revered cannon with right-on-the-mark pokes at its fabled facade. Cox has scripted an intermissonless one hour and forty five minute speeding magical locomotive that makes for a wild and wonderful ride.

One would think that a show and a cast that moves this quickly and delivers this many punch lines per second would be allowed to run amok to achieve those goal. That thinking would be incorrect. There’s a slow and steady hand at the helm of this madness that makes it all work and it belongs to director, Kristin McCarthy Parker. Reigning in all that creative energy and then knowing exactly when to unleash it is no simple task and her skill is to be admired.

Tilted Windmills Theatricals and producers John Arthur Pinckard and David Carpenter are to be commended here as well. They took great steps to protect, package, and promote this gem of a production in such a way that allowed it to be found by its adoring audience. They knew what they had and nurtured it wisely. Puffs began at the Peoples Improv Theater, where it gained its first momentum, before moving to the Elektra Theater where continued critical acclaim brought it to its current home at Stage 5 at New World Stages.

Puffs has broken two New World Stages box office records to date and is well on its way to break others as it repeatedly plays to sold out houses. It is primarily word of mouth support from its loyal and growing fan base that drives this well-deserved success. With Harry Potter and the Cursed Child opening shortly it’s easy to see how Puffs may just become a permanent fixture on the New York theatre scene as scores of fans flood into the city from all over the world to catch two of the hottest wizarding tickets within reach.

New World Stages
Stage 5
340 West 50th Street
New York, NY 10019
http://www.puffstheplay.com/
212.239.6200
$52-$97
Now Playing Through Nov 4, 2018

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror Writers Association.

18
Nov
17

The Red Shoes: My Review

The Red Shoes 1The mere mention of The Red Shoes conjures up technicolor memories of the 1948 Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger British film that tells the story of a love triangle sided by a controlling director, an idealistic composer, and a dedicated dancer thrown together in a creative crucible. It also brings to mind remembrances of the dark Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale of a pair of red slippers that once worn may never be removed until the dancer dies of exhaustion or has her feet cut off to make the madness end. First produced in London last year it took twenty years for director and choreographer Matthew Bourne and his New Adventures dance company to bring his sumptuous vision to life. Every day spent conceiving this masterpiece was time well spent.

The theatrical story of The Red Shoes follows the film closely. The simple plot is a love letter to dance, theatre, the life of performance artists at work and the sacrifices they are willing, or are forced to make, in order to create a legacy. Still set in the 1940’s, Victoria Page, a young ambitious dancer arrives at Covent Gardens to audition for the demanding company director Boris Lermontov. While there the company composer Julian Craster spies her as well. Once cast she begins her rise within the company ranks and in the hearts of both men. But they each want her for reasons of their own. Craster is in love with her heart. Lermontov is in love with her gifts. Once she dons the aforementioned shoes to dance the ballet written for her by the composer, and created for her by the director, she begins to feel torn by both men and her growing fame. Eventually the emotional and artistic strain is too much on the threesome and they begin to pull at each other. This results in rejection, revenge, and a tragic ending foretold by a train whistle in the first act.

The Red Shoes 4The phenomenal cast of twenty-six dancers includes members of Bourne’s New Adventures dance company, the New York City Ballet, and the American Ballet Theatre. In this particular performance Sam Archer was dark and dramatic as ballet impresario Boris Lermontov, Sara Mearns was exquisite and flawless in her role as rising star Victoria Page, and Marcelo Gomes was romantic and heartbreaking in his interpretation of struggling composer Julian Craster. The rest of this outstanding cast is split between a variety of dancers at various times. A mix born out of the necessity to rest dancers during what must be a grueling run. The choreography that guides and glides them all is detailed and complex. Scenes are filled with movement both front and center and deep in the background. Every character that occupies a space is at work bringing this vision to life.

The music of New York born composer Bernard Herrmann serves as the foundation that brings this lush world to life. The score of The Red Shoes is a compilation of the original film score and Herrmann’s works on Citizen Kane, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, and Fahrenheit 451. All these orchestrations were webbed together by Terry Davies into what amounts to a haunting score. In a traditional Broadway musical there is always the hope that the tunes are catchy enough that the audience is humming them as they leave the theatre. The score for The Red Shoes will be playing in the theatre of your mind in a bittersweet blend for days afterward.

The Red Shoes 3Though there has been some very impressive production design and execution, both on and off Broadway, this season but the sets, lights, sound, and costumes of The Red Shoes outshines them all. The beautifully clothed to perfection dancers dance but the set dances as well. A suspended curtained proscenium arch is flown about the stage as needed to give points of view from a myriad of angles. One moment we are on stage, the next we are backstage, the next we’re stage left, or stage right, and in one set of scenes with a simple side to side motion we are transported from one distant room to another. The rest of the settings from Covent Gardens, to the Monte Carlo Opera House, to a seaside resort, and theatrical offices, and lover’s apartments are all equally grand with minimal execution. Such is the magic of set and costume designer Lez Brotherston, lighting designer Paule Constable, projection designer Duncan McClean, and sound designer Paul Groothuis.

At the center of all this, The Red Shoes ballet itself is the culmination of all the parts of the overall whole. It’s different than the wild color explosion of the film and yet it holds its own as a darker richer piece. It’s a unique sparkling grey gothic gem at the center of a ring setting of bright color rich diamonds. To experience the New Adventures rendition of The Red Shoes is to surrender yourself to master storytellers using every facet of their talents to bring romance and tragedy to life. Without a single word spoken, with only powerful grace filled movement, one is made to truly believe in the transformative powers of a pair of crimson slippers.

New York City Center
Main Stage
131 West 55th St,
New York, NY
www.nycitycenter.org/pdps/TheRedShoes/
212.581.1212
Oct 26 – Nov 5, 2017
$35 – $140

From an original post on TheaterScene.

Photo credit Johan Persson.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is an Amazon KDP bestselling author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic adventure books, short stories, and poems. To date his combined works have earned over one hundred and fifty Amazon and Goodreads five star reviews from readers, reviewers, bloggers, teachers and fellow authors.

He is a native New Yorker who over time has built a significant and multifaceted career. He has been a producer, director, and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson creator of the Muppets.

Edward founded a successful independent production company dedicated to family entertainment and children’s causes. He also established a multimedia company in order to assist nonprofits achieve their own cause related goals. He went on to become a theme park designer. For fun he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood a sometime magician.

Currently Edward is a critic and feature entertainment columnist covering Broadway, Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, Clubs and Cabarets for TheaterScene and The Fire Island Sun. He also maintains his love of theatrical production by continuing to create new works for both stage and screen. And his dream of building a fully realized world of fantasy on tropical shores is still very much alive and well.

If you’d like more detailed information on Edward’s work, visit his LinkedIn profile or his website. You can also explore his books, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the American Theatre Critics Association, the Dramatists Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators, and the Horror Writers Association.




Edward Medina Author

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,116 other followers

It Is Said (MBKS 1)

It Is Said

A Murder of Crows

A Murder of Crows

The Demise of Foxy Jack

The Demise of Foxy Jack

Bones, crowns and gaman

Bones, Crowns and Gaman

AXP Special Edition 1

adventures of the x pirates special edition 1

Awilda

Awilda

The Corpse of Madeline Hill

The Corpse of Madeline Hill

the conversation

the conversation

casanova

stories new york

stories new york

Follow me on Twitter


%d bloggers like this: